16
Feb
09

Talking Points: 16 February

Economic focus on the far East today, with Hilary Clinton on tour, Japan in the depths of recession and China complaining about bail-outs being “protectionist”.

Here in the UK there’s talk of banks being nationalised and more calls for all sorts of people- not the least of which is Gordon Brown, to keep saying sorry. Here’s a good guide on how to say it…

There’s been another U.S missile attack in Pakistan – 20 dead ATOW . And this story   is also attracting a bit of attention – Sharia Law being signed off in a part of the north western Swat valley – what the people want, or appeasement to radicals, depending on your point of view.

We discussed the future of Pakistan at the end of last year , but it does make some wonder how the country will stay together. Is that the way to deal with it ?

Good day for Hugo Chavez- he can stay in power as long as he wins elections. Would a law like that in your own country make you shudder or is there no reason why not as long as the politician is at the peak of their powers ?

and nice to see that sport and politics still aren’t mixing- see this Israeli tennis player refused entry to the UAE..


10 Responses to “Talking Points: 16 February”


  1. 1 Dom
    February 16, 2009 at 10:22

    2 five years terms should be enough for any leader to accomplish his agenda. If you didn’t do something in 10, don’t expect to do be able to do it in 20, 30 or even 100. I come from Togo, a country where one man stayed in power for almost 40 years ( now his son is ruling). If you asked me what has he done in 40 years, I will say NOTHING except that he married 50 women and made 308 children.

  2. 2 Christina
    February 16, 2009 at 11:36

    As to the issue of allowing a politician to serve indefinitely as long as they are elected – America went through this with Franklin Delano Roosevet before the 22nd Amendment explicitly limited Presidents to two four-year terms. This was intended to prevent the President from becoming like a monarch.

    Your wording of the issue suggests the problems inherent with relying on a ‘democratic’ system to judge a leader. If he or she is at the peak of their powers this can also mean that they hold all of the power and influence, to the point that they control the supposedly free and fair elections.

    I believe a more fluid system allows for better representation, not just of the simple majority but of that minority (sometimes substantial) that is not acknowledged by a leader who is so entrenched and surrounded by power and influence as to be blind to the complex needs of their country.

    At the same time, I recognize that in many places a fluid government can mean wider instability. I will be interested to hear what others have to say on this issue.

  3. 3 Zainab from Iraq
    February 16, 2009 at 12:13

    Hello WHYS, i suggest these two talking points:

    1- The Biggest Congergation of the world:
    The Al-Arbai’in of Imam Hussein is commemorated 40 days after the martyrdom of Imam Hussein. Millions of Muslims seek to visit Imam Hussein walking to his shrine in the holy city of Karbala, in this day to mourn the beloved imam. The important thing is the shy press cover of this congregation, why is there no enough press there to show the significant of such a huge marathon.

    2- Dad at 13.
    Baby-faced Alfie, who is 13 but looks more like eight, became a father four days ago when his girlfriend Chantelle Steadman 15 years old gave birth to 7lb 3oz Maisie Roxanne.
    http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article2233878.ece

  4. 4 adesanya olawale
    February 16, 2009 at 12:45

    power corrupts & absolute power leads to situations we have in zimbabwe, somalia,zaire and potential problem spots like cameroon, no man can solve all the problem of his nation.nation should be allowed to reinvent themself with new leader like america did with obama.

  5. 5 gary
    February 16, 2009 at 13:06

    Concerning free trade, it is not wise to become dependent upon a group of human beings over which one has little control. China’s problems are China’s concern.

    Pakistan isn’t currently unified, allowing Sharia-sanctioned barbarism will make it less so.

    Concerning term limits, the dividing line between democracy and dictatorship is merely an effective means of disenfranchisement. It has always been and will remain so, regardless of term limits.
    g

  6. 6 Muhammad Asim Munir
    February 16, 2009 at 14:03

    Hi WHYS,

    I hope you all are fine.

    The situation in Pakistan is very complex but in order to correct it we need to focus many odd issues that are creating complexity. We need to think:

    1) Does US want to finish this war at once or want to fight it slowly and continuously for long?
    2) What role is being played by India and Afghanistan inside northern areas of Pakistan.
    3) Is Pakistani government sincere to end this war or using it for another purpose?
    4) Are Taleban being used and who is funding/supporting them in this long war?
    5) Are all Taleban real or we are facing dummy Taleban too?
    6) Do we really want to end this war?

    Warm regards,
    Muhammad Asim Munir
    Gujranwala, Pakistan.

  7. February 16, 2009 at 15:21

    Nationalization Isn’t Bad!
    Gordon Brown on Thursday said protectionism means less consumption, less production, more unemployment. The G7 is following his advice.
    We shouldn’t fear nationalization either. Former French president François Mitterrand nationalized thirty six banks and two finance companies between 1981 – 1982. They were ready to seize opportunities in the global market by the time Jacques Chirac came to power in 1995.
    Much of Southeast Asia, India, Pakistan and Iran must revert to some sort of communal enterprise if they are to weather the economic crunch.

  8. 8 John ijn Germany
    February 16, 2009 at 16:20

    Take a look at Nokia, and Rumania.

    Makes very interesting news.

    John in Germany

  9. 9 Roberto
    February 16, 2009 at 17:10

    RE “” Sharia Law being signed off in a part of the north western Swat valley – what the people want “”
    —————————————————————————————————————

    ———– Pakistan has had 60 yrs as a failed democracy.

    People are tired of corrupt democracies with their intractable do nothing bureaucracies. Sharia Law at least gives local Pakistanis some redress of local justice sad to say. If the mullahs turn out to be more effective adminstrators, the people aren’t gonna want a democratic system back.

    Look around people. Democracies are becoming the new failed states. People haven’t been electing credible leaders. They’ve instead been mislead by sociopathic politicians who’ve run the wheels off the global economy. Look at the damage Hitler did through the elective process in Germany.

  10. 10 John in Germany
    February 17, 2009 at 15:53

    Question, we can influence the party picture when we vote. We have no means in selecting who is put on the voting list unless we all, become party members, and go to the meetings.

    Through the medium we are informed what wrangling, pushing, mobbing, miss-use, ETC. that goes on at these meetings, and behind locked doors. We have then no choice but to vote for the party of our choice. In some countries the voters have to face force,Kidnapping, threats, bribery, religious shut outs, and so on, so that they may vote. Dictators are on the make in some South American lands. The voters wont even notice the change until it is to late. Watch the Body Language.

    Here in Germany the extreme right wing are creeping up on us, and we watch them on TV and wonder why they are not banned? A gang of them attacked some Young Socialists on their way back from Dresden., we await the trial and the sentences with concern.

    Greetings
    Sad old World, in some places.
    John in Germany


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: